Skip to Navigation Skip to Page Content

Mizzou Engineering associate dean wins lifetime achievement award

Sam Kiger, Mizzou Engineering's associate dean for research, has received a national lifetime achievement award for his work on designing blast- and shock-resistant structures.

Mizzou Engineering Associate Dean for Research Sam Kiger, an internationally recognized expert in explosion effects and the design of blast-resistant structures, has received a national lifetime achievement award for his leadership in the shock and vibration field.

Kiger received the Shock and Vibration Information Analysis Center’s (SAVIAC) Lifetime Achievement Award at the group’s 79th Shock and Vibration Symposium on Oct. 28 in Florida. SAVIAC is a federally funded research center for blast- and shock-resistant design based in Virginia.

“It’s a great honor to be recognized by one’s peers—and members of this group are very much my peers,” Kiger said.

The SAVIAC award cited Kiger’s “profound accomplishments” in designing structures that better resist the damage caused by explosions. Before joining Mizzou, Kiger worked on several federal government projects to protect against bombs and explosions, and directed numerous Department of Defense programs researching the vulnerability and survivability of underground command and control structures.

SAVIAC also specifically pointed to Kiger’s contributions as editor and principal author of the U.S. Army’s “Fundamentals of Protective Construction,” a technical manual outlining blast-resistant design for military construction.

Kiger continues to work on research related to blast-resistant design in a number of venues.

He currently serves as director of both the MU Center for Transportation Security and the National Center for Explosion Resistant Design, which provide support for anti-terrorism and military programs. Kiger also is part of a Department of Homeland Security and Army Engineer Research and Development Center team developing strategies to shield economically important and iconic bridges from explosion effects, and is working as well with a Mizzou team to make a new portable wastewater treatment system for military bases impact- and shock-resistant.

Kiger’s diligence in teaching the skills he garnered through his wide-ranging experience provide “an unusual element of timelessness to a highly distinguished career,” the SAVIAC award states. It’s an element that Kiger likewise highlighted.

“I am especially pleased that at Mizzou we now have a well-supported explosion effects research program,” Kiger said. “We’re graduating engineers who are prepared to make important contributions to our national defense and homeland security.

Mizzou Engineering Associate Dean for Research Sam Kiger, an internationally recognized expert in explosion effects and the design of blast-resistant structures, has received a national lifetime achievement award for his leadership in the shock and vibration field.

Kiger received the Shock and Vibration Information Analysis Center’s (SAVIAC) Lifetime Achievement Award at the group’s 79th Shock and Vibration Symposium on Oct. 28 in Florida. SAVIAC is a federally funded research center for blast- and shock-resistant design based in Virginia.

“It’s a great honor to be recognized by one’s peers—and members of this group are very much my peers,” Kiger said.

The SAVIAC award cited Kiger’s “profound accomplishments” in designing structures that better resist the damage caused by explosions. Before joining Mizzou, Kiger worked on several federal government projects to protect against bombs and explosions, and directed numerous Department of Defense programs researching the vulnerability and survivability of underground command and control structures.

SAVIAC also specifically pointed to Kiger’s contributions as editor and principal author of the U.S. Army’s “Fundamentals of Protective Construction,” a technical manual outlining blast-resistant design for military construction.

Kiger continues to work on research related to blast-resistant design in a number of venues.

He currently serves as director of both the MU Center for Transportation Security and the National Center for Explosion Resistant Design, which provide support for anti-terrorism and military programs. Kiger also is part of a Department of Homeland Security and Army Engineer Research and Development Center team developing strategies to shield economically important and iconic bridges from explosion effects, and is working as well with a Mizzou team to make a new portable wastewater treatment system for military bases impact- and shock-resistant.

Kiger’s diligence in teaching the skills he garnered through his wide-ranging experience provide “an unusual element of timelessness to a highly distinguished career,” the SAVIAC award states. It’s an element that Kiger likewise highlighted.

“I am especially pleased that at Mizzou we now have a well-supported explosion effects research program,” Kiger said. “We’re graduating engineers who are prepared to make important contributions to our national defense and homeland security.”