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Yuwen Zhang publishes innovative textbook

Yuwen Zhang, a professor in the mechanical and aerospace engineering department, has co-published a textbook titled “Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer” with Amir Faghri and John Howell.

Yuwen Zhang, professor in the mechanical and aerospace engineering department, stands at the forefront of his field in closing educational gaps. In June he published a premier textbook in an effort to cover all pertinent topics of emerging technologies in a single volume, something Zhang said does not exist. Zhang co-authored “Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer” with Amir Faghri and John Howell.

The book discusses relevant advanced heat and mass transfer topics in heat conduction, convection, radiation and multi-phase transport phenomena – all in a single textbook, explained from a fundamental point of view. Some of the material includes generalized integral, differential, and average formulations for governing equations of transport phenomena. Chapters also touch on modern applications of heat and mass transfer, such as nanotechnology, biotechnology, energy and material processing.

Zhang, who came to Mizzou in 2003, said that traditionally, heat and mass transfer at the graduate level is taught in four separate course: heat conduction, convective heat transfer, mass transfer and radiation.

“The materials in these courses are rather extensive. Some of them are even irrelevant,” Zhang said. He sees the fact that graduate students are not given appropriate exposure to topics related to modern emerging technologies as a real problem.

“We want to fill this gap,” Zhang said.

The team started writing the book in the middle of 2007, one year after the publication of Zhang’s first book, “Transport Phenomena in Multiphase Systems” – co-authored with Faghri, professor at the University of Connecticut. Zhang, Faghri and Howell, professor at the University of Texas at Austin, began discussing the idea and realized the need for the newly published textbook. After three years of research, revision, and extensive discussion, Zhang said he is pleased with the high quality of the finished piece, adding that it exceeds their original goals.

Zhang received his doctorate in mechanical engineering at the University of Connecticut.