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This file is attached to: Assistive technology: the conjunction of man and machine

DeSouza-teamm-members

MU Discovery freshman Jaime Germer and sophomore Neil Thawani look at a program they are writing to sample data from an electromyographic (EMG) sensor that once processed, will help to define the patterns of muscle activation. Click the image for more details.

Successful past projects from students working in the robotic assistive technology lab include:

* A power wheelchair control interface, investigated as a capstone project by Mahmood Sobahy, Truc Bui, Sarah Danner and Joe Ayala, allows a wheelchair to be operated by humming noises. Students programmed a microcontroller to analyze and recognize four frequencies associated with forward, backward, right and left movements of the power wheelchair.

* Ahmad Alshbly, Mohammed Abu Haleegah, Tony Hoff and Jeff Piersol equipped a wired EMG switch with a wireless Bluetooth interface, allowing greater freedom for the operator to switch back and forth between functions: wheelchair, cell phone and computer operation.

* A graphical interface for a smartphone was developed by Joe Scaduto, which allows the user to control the operation of the phone via the EMG switch. The switch, connected to the COM port via the Bluetooth interface, triggers horizontal and vertical bars to pan the display creating crosshairs for target selection.



This file is attached to: Assistive technology: the conjunction of man and machine