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Skubic named honorary nursing alumna, distinguished former student

Two women and one man pose for a group photo.

Electrical and computer engineering professor Marjorie Skubic, poses with Marilyn Rantz, an MU Curators’ Professor of nursing, and MU Chancellor Brady Deaton at a banquet April 5 where Skubic was named an Honorary Alumna of MU’s Sinclair School of Nursing.

Marjorie Skubic, an MU professor with joint appointments in electrical and computer engineering and computer science, was named an Honorary Alumna of the University of Missouri’s Sinclair School of Nursing on April 5.

Two weeks later, Skubic was again recognized for her accomplishments when she was honored as the Distinguished Former Student Awardee by the Texas A&M Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

Sponsored by the Sinclair Nursing Alumni Organization, the MU banquet and ceremony recognized student, staff and faculty excellence, as well as outstanding alumni and collaborators.

Sensor technologies developed by Skubic’s research team through the MU Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology are key components of her “aging in place” research efforts with collaborator Marilyn Rantz, an MU Curators’ Professor of nursing. The sensors, aimed at non-invasive monitoring of human behaviors that may signal declining health and even emergency situations, have been successfully piloted at TigerPlace, an active retirement community developed by Americare in affiliation with Sinclair School of Nursing.

“Never in a million years would I have expected to receive an alumna nursing award,” Skubic told those gathered to celebrate nursing achievements and achievers. “I went to a meeting and when Marilyn asked for volunteers, I raised my hand.

My association with Marilyn and the other nurses has been the most satisfying and memorable part of my career.”

On April 18, Skubic was honored as a distinguished former student by the Dwight Look College of Engineering’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M. where she earned her doctorate in 1997. As a graduate student at Texas A&M, Skubic specialized in distributed telerobotics and robot programming by demonstration.

In accepting the award, Skubic thanked her advisor, Professor Dick Volz, and others for guiding her education and offered the students some advice.

“There are two important ingredients that have helped me in the eldertech work,” Skubic said. “First, don’t be afraid to seize an opportunity even if you are not sure where it will lead. And second, be persistent! Persistence trumps genius, education, and experience. Without our persistence, this work would never have happened.”