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Triplett named SEC Academic Leadership Development Program fellow

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ECE Associate Professor Gregory Triplett was one of four MU faculty members named a 2013-2014 SEC Academic Leadership Development Program fellow.

Gregory Triplett, associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, is one of four University of Missouri faculty members to be named a 2013-2014 SEC Academic Leadership Development Program fellow.

The SEC ALDP is a professional development program that seeks to identify, prepare and advance academic leaders for roles within SEC institutions and beyond. The program has two components: a university-level development program designed by each institution for its own participants and two SEC workshops for all program participants.

“It’s a privilege to get this level of exposure to how other institutions deal with changes in the academy,” Triplett said. “It’s my opinion that Mizzou has a lot of potential and if there is a way I can be of service, I will maximize the opportunity to make a difference.”

The SEC ALDP, established in 2008, fosters academic leadership among SEC faculty by allowing them opportunities to address the challenges of academic administration at major research universities.

“This is a chance for me to interact with other campus leaders to learn of strategies that work for them and to highlight what Mizzou does well and to share our collective strengths,” Triplett said.

Triplett additionally serves as associate director of the MU Honors College where his role involves strategic planning and communications, honors research, pre-health advising and curriculum development.

Other MU faculty named as SEC ALDP fellows include Stephen Ferris, senior associate dean for graduate studies and research, Robert J. Trulaske, Sr. College of Business; Jana Hawley, professor and department chair, Department of Textile and Apparel Management, College of Human and Environmental Sciences; and Sandy Rikoon, associate dean for research and graduate studies, College of Human and Environmental Sciences.