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What’s new with CS student organizations?

The Computer Science Department’s student organizations have had a busy year planning events that involve students from across the university and sometimes beyond. A hackathon was a first for the one organization and other organizations are concentrating on helping students learn industry and secure a dream job after graduation.

More than a dozen students watch a slide presentation while listening to the speaker.

Students from the Computer Science Graduate Student Council attend the organizations IBM talk last fall. Photo courtesy of CSGSC

Computer Science Graduate Student Council

The Computer Science Graduate Student Council has expanded its number of annual events and also has invited undergraduates to visit some of the events and explore the organization. President Avimanyou Vatsa said the CSGSC is getting ready for its annual spring poster competition. Last semester, the organization held a similar event paired with a barbecue in Peace Park.

The organization hosted an additional industry talk in September, hosting a presentation from researchers at IBM. A second presentation in November featured Peng Zhuang, a Computer Science Department alumnus working for Google.

Officers for 2013-2014: Avimanyou Vatsa, president; Son Nguyen, vice president; Mahdieh Poostchi Mohammadaba, treasurer; Manav Singhal, secretary; Lingxue Wu, web admin.

Students watching a presentation offscreen.

Coders at the Association for Computing Machinery’s first hackathon, Hack Mizzou listen to the assignments and goals of the day before starting their team projects. Photo courtesy of ACM

Association for Computing Machinery

The Association for Computing Machinery spent its fall semester organizing and hosting its first large-scale hackathon in November. ACM president and event organizer Daniel Silver said he hopes Hack Mizzou becomes an annual College of Engineering event . Based on similar events at MIT and Penn State, the competion brings together computer scientists and enthusiasts “hacking out” apps, websites and data sifting programs to create projects on a “social” themes. Prizes were awarded to the top team in one of four categories, and included hard drives, gift cards or a Raspberry Pi single board computer starter kit.

The organization held its first spring meeting Feb. 12. An Android workshop and computing-themed social events are planned this spring.

Officers for 2013-2014: Dan Silver, president; Ben Sammons, vice president; Megan Ritchey, treasurer; Gabbi Perdieu, secretary.

Students visit booths and talk to employment recruiters.

Job hopefuls and students looking to expand their network with employers talk to company recruiters at the September Employers’ Showcase, hosted by Upsilon Pi Epsilon. Photo courtesy of UPE

Upsilon Pi Epsilon

Upsilon Pi Epsilon has worked to get computer science students ready for the job search. The organization held its annual Employer Showcase in September and the previous spring. Companies from computer science-related fields came to Mizzou Engineering to network and introduce themselves and employment opportunities to UPE members and computer science and information technology students. The event was open to both MU and non-MU students.

UPE members took a two-day trip to the Kansas City Developer Conference in May. Just before the fall 2013 semester began, the organization took 38 MU students from across the engineering disciplines to site visits at companies in the Kansas City area, including Garmin, Cerner and IBM.

In preparation for that event and the College of Engineering’s career fairs, UPE also continues to host mock interviews and resume reviews, tutoring and personal mentoring.

Officers for 2013-2014: Michael Rowden, president; Aaron Scantlin, vice president; Michael Brush, treasurer; Tyler Morton, secretary; Ankil Patel, historian; Tyler Juch, project lead.