Skip to Navigation Skip to Page Content

IMSE adds four to the faculty

The MU Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Department added a quality quartet to its faculty roster for the 2013-14 academic year.

Portrait of Ron McGarvey

Ron McGarvey joined the IMSE Department with a joint appointment in the Harry S. Truman School of Public Affairs.

Ronald McGarvey, Jung Hyup Kim, Timothy Middelkoop and Emmanuelle Wallach are the newest members of the IMSE faculty, replacing the departed Linsey Steege — who took a job at the University of Wisconsin — and Mustafa Sir and Esra Siskogulu, who returned to their native Turkey to be closer to their families.

McGarvey, who earned his doctorate at Pennsylvania State University, came to MU on a joint appointment as an assistant professor with IMSE and the Harry S. Truman School of Public Affairs. Before coming to MU, he worked for 11 years at the RAND Corporation, a nonprofit focused on research-based policy and decision-making, where he supported came mainly with Project AIR FORCE, a federally-funded research and development center tasked with analyzing policy for the U.S. Air Force.

The dual appointment allows McGarvey to continue to apply his research to practical problems in the public sector, particularly in the use of applied optimization and resource management.

“That’s been a lot of fun, too. One thing I’ve really liked about Missouri is how welcoming other professors are with respect to asking me to join their teams or to collaborate with them on multidisciplinary topics,” he said.

The teaching aspect of the job also intrigued McGarvey, who is teaching a course this semester called “Management Science for the Public Sector.”

“That’s been really the biggest change for me,” McGarvey said. “The research is more similar than different. Interacting with students every day was something I didn’t have the opportunity to do when I was at RAND.”

Portrait of Jung Hyup Kim

Jung Hyup Kim’s position in the IMSE Department is his first in academia. He earned his doctorate from Pennsylvania State University in 2013.

Kim recently earned his doctorate — like McGarvey, from Penn State — before joining the IMSE faculty as an assistant professor. His research is expected to focus on human-in-the-loop simulation, cognitive human factors and human-computer interaction.

It’s Kim’s first academic appointment, and he’s enjoying taking the reins of his own research investigating human-computer interaction and how best to optimize that interaction with laptops, smart phones, tablets and the wealth of technology humans use daily.

“Before I got this job, I was a researcher, so basically what I did was follow my adviser’s direction and initiate the research,” he said. “Now, I have to do everything by myself, and this is quite fun. Now, I am the adviser.”

Middelkoop-Timothy

Timothy Middelkoop is in the process of finishing a one-year teaching assignment with the IMSE Department and was recently named the MU campus director of research computing support services.

Middelkoop is in the process of finishing his one-year teaching assignment with IMSE before settling into a joint-appointment role as the MU campus director of research computing support services, while still retaining some instructor responsibilities with IMSE.

Portrait of Emmanuelle Wallach

Emmanuelle Wallach is an adjunct instructor who brought with her a grant for the department to use state-of-the-art simulation software, Simio Enterprise Edition.

Middelkoop previously was a faculty member with the University of Florida’s Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and an assistant engineer, adjunct professor and assistant director of UF’s Industrial Assessment Center. He earned his doctorate from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Wallach is an adjunct instructor and brought with her a grant for the department to use state-of-the-art simulation software, Simio Enterprise Edition. She earned her bachelor’s degree in France, her home country, before completing her master’s at Penn State in 2012. The Simio grant provided 100 copies of the hardware, valued at $228,000. It’s a tool that should couple nicely with her knowledge of simulation models, providing a nice one-two punch for students.