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Singhal earns more than just accolade at app competition

An app competition led not only to an honor for one University of Missouri computer science doctoral student, but also a great opportunity.

Singhal

Computer science doctoral student Manav Singhal’s mScan application for the Android operating system earned him a runner-up selection at the OPSWAT Student App Competition, and that work earned him an internship with OPSWAT, a provider of software management and security technologies, in San Francisco this summer.

Manav Singhal’s mScan application for the Android operating system earned him a runner-up selection at the OPSWAT Student App Competition, and that work earned him an internship with OPSWAT, a provider of software management and security technologies, in San Francisco this summer.

The contest was open to university students nationwide. Competitors were required to write a software application that worked with OPSWAT’s Metascan Online Public API — a server application that allows users to use multiple antivirus scanning technologies at once to improve security — and to demonstrate its value.

Singhal’s mScan app allows for scanning of files, folders and the entire mobile device for Android users to help eliminate viruses and spam.

Upon hearing the news of his runner-up selection, Singhal said he was “elated,” a feeling that grew exponentially upon receiving an offer to interview for an internship at OPSWAT.

“I had worked hard on making the app, and the work paid off. After a couple rounds of technical [interviews] and one personal interview, they offered me a software engineering intern position,” Singhal said. “An internship in San Francisco with OPSWAT is no less than a dream come true. I am so excited for this summer.”

Singhal found out about the contest through an email sent out to all computer science graduate students. He began working on the app immediately after his idea was approved by OPSWAT.

“Once the app was complete, we had to submit the source code, compiled binary code and documentation for use by OPSWAT for judging the submission entries,” Singhal said.

Three winners were selected from a wide array of apps for a wide array of operating systems, and four more were given runner-up status — including Singhal.

Singhal opted for an Android app because of his previous experience with the Android. Several of his creations are available via Google Play. He likes Android’s open-source capabilities and popularity.

The mScan application currently is available on the student competition page at https://www.metascan-online.com/student-competition. Singhal said he plans to continue to update the app if and when MetaScan Online adds features that would prompt such an update.