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Missouri WTS chapter selects two from MU for scholarships

One of Women’s Transportation Seminar International’s guiding principles is its dedication to building the future of transportation through the global advancement of women, and one of the ways the 37-year old organization achieves this goal is by awarding scholarships to assist young women who aspire to professional career in transportation.

This spring, Missouri’s WTS chapter selected two young women majoring in civil engineering at the University of Missouri as scholarship recipients.

Martz

Paige Martz, a junior MU civil engineering major from Kansas City, was awarded WTS’s Molitoris Leadership Scholarship for Undergraduates.

Paige Martz, a junior from Kansas City, was awarded WTS’s Molitoris Leadership Scholarship for Undergraduates, and Yue Zhang, a master’s student who will graduate in December 2014, received the WTS Leadership Legacy Scholarship for Graduates. Both work in the College of Engineering’s Transportation Lab under the direction of Professors Carlos Sun and Praveen Edara.

Martz said she was attracted to transportation engineering because of the human factor involved in the work.

“I like the human uncertainty, and I enjoy the type of math that’s involved,” she explained.

Martz serves as president for the MU student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). She also is a member of the engineering sorority Alpha Omega Epsilon.

Yue Zhang

Yue Zhang, a master’s student in civil engineering who will graduate in December 2014, received the WTS Leadership Legacy Scholarship for Graduates.

“It’s such a nice support group,” she said of her membership in AOE. “It’s great to get to know a group of girls who know what you’re going through.”

Martz worked an internship at Terracon in Kansas City last summer, testing concrete in various locations. This coming summer she is set to return to K.C. to intern at HNTB Corporation. She plans to attend graduate school after earning her bachelor’s degree next May.

Zhang’s thesis is on work zone software calibration and validation. Edara is her faculty mentor. She said she chose to study transportation because it is universally necessary and because of its influence on people’s efficiency and safety.

“I am so proud to be a transportation engineer. I can use my knowledge to improve something which can affect everyone’s life,” she added.

Zhang plans to enter the workforce after completing her master’s degree. She said she wants to turn her years of transportation training toward solving practical problems and to continue to build on the things she has learned. She also looks forward to earning her Professional Engineer certification.