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AASHTO names diverging diamond interchange project to ‘Sweet Sixteen’

Aerial view of a Diverging Diamond Interchange.

An aerial view of a Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI). A team of University of Missouri researchers recently saw its project named one of 2015’s “Sweet Sixteen” High Value Research Projects by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Research Advisory Committee for its work with such interchanges.

A team of University of Missouri researchers recently saw its project named one of 2015’s “Sweet Sixteen” High Value Research Projects by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Research Advisory Committee.

Praveen Edara and Carlos Sun, associate professors in the Civil Engineering Department, are co-principal investigators on a project funded by the Missouri Department of Transportation and the Mid-America Transportation Center called “Safety Evaluation of the Diverging Diamond Interchanges (DDIs) in Missouri.” Henry Brown, a research engineer in the Civil Engineering Department, also is involved with the project, and Boris Claros and Paige Martz are the graduate and undergraduate researchers, respectively.

Praveen Edara and Carlos Sun pose for a photo by a street sign.

Praveen Edara and Carlos Sun, associate professors in the Civil Engineering Department, are co-principal investigators on a project funded by the Missouri Department of Transportation and the Mid-America Transportation Center called “Safety Evaluation of the Diverging Diamond Interchanges (DDIs) in Missouri.”

The “Sweet Sixteen” are selected from a pool of transportation-related projects encompassing the entire nation. These projects are recognized annually at the National Academy of Sciences’ Transportation Research Board/Research Advisory Committee meeting in July as well as the annual AASHTO Research Advisory Committee meeting. The projects also will be recognized at a poster session at January’s Transportation Research Board Meeting.

“We are honored that our research group and Missouri DOT were recognized by AASHTO for this important research project,” Edara said. “Our research found that DDIs are not only solving traffic congestion problems, but also saving lives by decreasing vehicle crashes. The study and its findings should also assist other states considering innovative interchange designs.”

For more background information on the project, please click the links below:

Transportation Inspiration

Undergrad takes diverging diamond research to Posters on the Hill