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ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference accepts group of MU students

A group of MU students working in the Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory have been accepted to the 2015 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Summer Bioengineering Conference, which will be held from June 17-20 in Snowbird, Utah.

Headshot of Ferris Pfeiffer.

Ferris Pfeiffer, a Mizzou Advantage Scholar in the One Health/One Medicine focus area and head of Biomechanics and Bioengineering at the Comparative Orthopedic Laboratory, was pleased that all five of his students who he encouraged to submit abstracts had been accepted to the 2015 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Summer Bioengineering Conference.

There they will present their research on topics such as the manufacturing of a biodegradable scaffold for tissue engineered knee cartilage replacement, the biomechanics and effects of different ligaments in the knee and the study of the hip disorder slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

Ferris Pfeiffer, a Mizzou Advantage Scholar in the One Health/One Medicine focus area and head of Biomechanics and Bioengineering at the Comparative Orthopedic Laboratory, was pleased that all five of his students who he encouraged to submit abstracts had been accepted.

“It’s great,” Pfeiffer said. “Any time we get recognition for our work it definitely kind of validates what we’re doing here and it’s great to have that level of peer review and peer acceptance of our work.”

The undergraduate students going to the conference are Andrew Polk, Carly Garrow and Jacob Harris.

“The opportunity to compete at a national conference is certainly a big deal for (undergraduates),” Pfeiffer said.

Pfeiffer said this success serves an example of the benefits of Mizzou advantage funding.

Pfeiffer’s faculty position is funded through Mizzou Advantage, a focus program that works to strengthen interdisciplinary collaboration within the University of Missouri. The funding affords his double appointment in orthopedic surgery and bioengineering.

“That allows me a greater interaction than some have with both schools, and the benefit of having that funding and having my position is that it allows some of this collaborative work to take place,” he said.

Pfeiffer is within the One Health/One Medicine focus area, which has the goal of converging human and animal health. One identified way of benefiting that goal was to leverage the strengths of the College of Engineering and the School of Medicine to drive innovation and basic science research through collaboration. Much of the work done in his lab has grown from that collaboration.

“There are coauthors who are in the school of medicine as well as the College of Engineering, so this is another example how engineering and school of medicine are kind of working together to move research forward,” he said. “It gives an opportunity for engineering and medicine students to interact and share together on these kinds of projects. I always think that’s important to highlight.”