Skip to Navigation Skip to Page Content
Photo: Plasmic gratings in a specimen dish

Plasmic gratings fabricated from commercial HD DVD or Blu-ray by low cost process enhance fluorescence more than 100-fold, resulting in highly sensitive detection for biomedical diagnostics at point- of-care. The same technology can be applied to super resolution imaging.

The National Science Foundation, through its Innovation Corps Teams Program, has granted funding of $50,000 for six months to Shubhra Gangopadhyay, C.W. LaPierre Chair Professor in electrical and computer engineering, and her I-Corps team. The purpose of the program is to provide NSF-funded researchers with additional funds through a competitive process to help turn scientific discoveries into commercialized projects.

The grant, which marks the first NSF I-Corps funding for a team from MU, will be used for training and experience in the process of discovering potential customers for the project titled “I-Corps Teams: Ultrasensitive Fluorescence Bio-sensing Platforms for Diagnostics and Molecular Imaging.”

The team is comprised of five people: Gangopadhyay serves as principal investigator (PI); Sangho Bok, post-doctoral fellow, is entrepreneurial lead; and Eric Barmann, licensing assistant with MU’s technology management and industry relations, and Bonnie Bachman, professor of economics at Missouri University of Science and Technology, serve as project mentors. Keshab Gangopadhyay, research professor in electrical and computer engineering, is co-PI of the proposal.

After the team completes a seven-week course that follows the I-Corps curriculum, there are three possible outcomes for the project. The first is a clear “yes” or “no” decision regarding viability of products and services. The second, should the decision be to go forward with the project, is a transition plan for the project. The third outcome is moving forward toward commercialization by incorporation of a new company.