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Chemical engineer guest edits journal’s special issue

Hammond poses, arms crossed, in a foyer.

Karl Hammond, an assistant professor in the Chemical Engineering Department, took a leading role as guest editor of the journal’s “Special Issue on Measuring and Modeling of Plasma-Material Interactions,” which was printed in January of this year. Photos by Jennifer Hollis.

The 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics (APS DPP) featured a mini-conference, “Measuring and Modeling of Plasma-Material Interactions.” This mini-conference led to a special issue of the journal Fusion Science and Technology, with the four mini-conference organizers serving as guest editors. This quartet of guest editors included the MU College of Engineering’s own Karl Hammond.

Hammond, an assistant professor in the Chemical Engineering Department, took a leading role as guest editor of the journal’s “Special Issue on Measuring and Modeling of Plasma-Material Interactions,” which was printed in January of this year. Additionally, he authored an article of his own and contributed data, figures and expertise to four other articles in the special issue. Hammond’s paper, titled “Simulation of Helium Behavior Near Subsurface Prismatic Dislocation Loops in Tungsten,” discussed simulations of how helium bubbles gather around previously existing dislocation loops.

“Imagine stacked stress balls for example, and if I were to kind of stick an extra layer of stress balls in there, they might look locally like there’s nothing strange, but if you look further back, something doesn’t quite line up,” he explained. “This row has six balls in it, but this one has seven. That extra plane of atoms creates what is called a dislocation. That’s why metals aren’t as strong as they’d otherwise be, because those dislocations move around.

Karl Hammond writes on a chalkboard.

On top of his editing duties, Hammond authored an article of his own and contributed data, figures and expertise to four other articles in the special issue.

“What we were worried about is whether these helium atoms — which we don’t want to stay in the material — whether they aggregate around the edges of dislocation loops or other stress fields, which are going to be present in the material no matter what you do. We suspected the answer was yes, and that’s what this paper was about, demonstrating that yes, that’s what will happen.”

The issue consists of 10 technical articles and two technical notes on topics related to those discussed at the mini-conference within the APS DPP meeting on measuring and modeling of plasma-material interactions.

“I was one of the co-chairs of a session for that [mini-conference],” Hammond said. “While I was there, the editor of the journal talked to both myself and my former adviser at the University of Tennessee (Brian Wirth) about the idea of doing a special issue for this based on talks at that mini-conference.”

As a guest editor, Hammond was tasked with aiding the paper collection process, reminding authors of deadlines and deciding how to order the papers in the printed issue so that concepts tied together in a somewhat logical way.

“Obviously, these were written as individual pieces, but there was a method to the madness as to how they were ordered,” he said.

The special issue is available online and in print from the American Nuclear Society through the Taylor and Francis publishing house.