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MU’s Grant selected to join latest group of NAI Fellows

Sheila Grant Profile Pic

Sheila Grant, professor of Bioengineering and the College of Engineering’s associate dean of research, recently was selected as a National Academy of Inventors Fellow.

Sheila Grant’s extensive work in the areas of sensors and biomaterials has led to the formation of companies, cutting-edge research breakthroughs, patents and more. And all of that success has led to yet another world-class accolade.

Grant, professor of Bioengineering and the College of Engineering’s associate dean of research, recently was selected as a National Academy of Inventors Fellow. NAI Fellows are members of a prestigious group that holds more than 32,000 U.S. patents, has created more than 9,400 technologies and/or companies and has generated nearly $140 billion in revenue from their discoveries. The 912 Fellows represent some of the globe’s most well-renowned universities and research institutes.

“It feels so good to know that all that hard work pays off,” Grant explained. “And an award like this, it’s not just me. It’s a lot of us who’ve worked together — my grad students, undergraduate students and my collaborators. It’s all of us working together.”

Institutions which have NAI chapters are allowed to nominate members for selection as Fellows. Those nominees are then voted on by the NAI Fellows Selection Committee. Potential Fellows must be affiliated with an academic entity and must be named inventors on a U.S. patent. Fellows are considered among the most prolific innovators from academia, helping bring to life inventions with “a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.”

Grant said it was nice to be thought of in such a way by her peers in the field and hopes that having another NAI Fellow will help boost the reputation of both Mizzou and the College of Engineering. Given how difficult success can be in this field, she’s taking nothing for granted.

“It’s almost an unbelievable feeling when you do achieve something,” she said. “We’re used to disappointment, not getting a proposal funded or research going not the way you like. So when we do have success, we have to celebrate.”

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