Missouri Compacts: Research and Creative Works, Page 28

Image of 17th Century Latin American handwriting merged with machine learning model.

Mizzou Engineer Using Machine Learning to Translate Historical Script

What do you do with 200,000 handwritten historical records nobody can read? Call an engineer. That’s what Viviana Grieco did when she needed help decoding a collection of 17th Century notary records from Argentina. Now, she and Praveen Rao, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and health management and informatics at Mizzou, are using machine learning to translate these texts.

Image of highway from driver's point of view and with alert system in use

Study: Drivers Experience Four Levels of Attentive ‘Gaze’ in Response to Alerts From Pre-crash Warning Systems

A team of engineers at the University of Missouri conducted open road testing of three collision avoidance systems and demonstrated that a drivers’ visual behavior in response to an alert generated from a collision avoidance system can be divided into one of four different behavioral categories: active gaze, self-conscious gaze, attentive gaze and ignored gaze.

Screen showing Mizzou REU participants

Undergraduates Conduct Research Through Mizzou REU

They analyzed data from medical records. Studied the impact of virtual learning environments. And came up with ways to better detect fake videos. In the end, participants of this year’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program at Mizzou Engineering gained a deeper appreciation of research and how it applies to everyday life

Prasad Calyam

NSF Project to Advance Edge Computing

Edge computing has the potential to make our computers and devices run smarter and faster. Right now, though, the technology is in its infancy and not ready for prime time.

Eduardo Torres Dominguez performing lab work

Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces

In the future, a durable coating could help keep food-contact surfaces clean in the food processing industry, including in meat processing plants. A new study from a team of University of Missouri engineers and food scientists demonstrates that the coating — made from titanium dioxide — is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of protection against future cross-contamination on stainless steel food-contact surfaces.

Sean Goggins stands in a road in front of lawns and trees while wearing a grey shirt.

EECS Faculty Member Helps Develop Metrics for Open Source Software

Those wanting to download and use open source software in the future will have a better sense of what they’re getting, thanks in part to the work of a Mizzou Engineer. Open source software is computer software distributed with a license that allows anyone to see, use and modify the original code. In many cases, an open source project attracts other developers who contribute to the project. This forms a community where those involved improve and enhance the software. Sean Goggins, an associate professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is helping develop metrics to give potential contributors and users better insight into open source projects.

Drawing of person writing on their forearm.

The New Tattoo: Drawing Electronics on Skin

One day, people could monitor their own health conditions by simply picking up a pencil and drawing a bioelectronic device on their skin. In a new study, University of Missouri engineers demonstrated that the simple combination of pencils and paper could be used to create devices that might be used to monitor personal health.

Portrait of Chanwoo Park

Improving the Performance of UAVs

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are a major tool in the current arsenal for the U.S. military. They are used ever increasingly for a variety of missions to help keep personnel out of harm’s way.

Portrait of Henry Brown

Improving Work Zone Safety

A sure sign that summer has arrived in Missouri is when the heat and humidity return. Another indication of summer is when the “Road Construction Ahead” signs pop up along the state’s highways, roads and streets. These signs usually indicate delays in getting to your destination.

MOfeatureimage

Mizzou Engineers, Physicians to Help Rural Missouri Plan Ahead for Pandemic: Geospatial Big Data is Key

Planning ahead for a pandemic—or any disaster situation—is costly and complex. Now, Mizzou researchers are hoping to take the guesswork out of it for Missouri’s smaller communities.