Missouri Compacts: Research and Creative Works, Page 31

A man in glasses, jacket and tie stands in a workshop.

Research success garners Mizzou’s McFarland lofty NSF award

The National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award is a stamp of approval for a nascent faculty researcher. It tells everyone that one of the nation’s leading authorities on science believes in their research and believes it will provide world-class breakthroughs for years to come.

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Water work: Duo presents at Emerging Researchers National Conference

The Emerging Researchers National Conference (ERN) in STEM selects top student researchers to present groundbreaking projects, with the goal of advancing their abilities to effectively communicate in the science community and ultimately their future careers. Two Mizzou Engineers were among the high-caliber students selected.

Various road signs closing off a street. They read

Driver distractions in work zones can be costly

Distractions in the car are everywhere. Texting, taking a call, changing the radio, attending to passengers, picking up a dropped item — all of them can cause us to lose sight of the road for a few seconds. But mere seconds can be the difference between life and death.

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A fine fellow: Grad student receives prestigious federal fellowship

Jacob Kaltenbronn wasn’t planning on going to graduate school. Then he landed an undergraduate research opportunity in the transportation laboratory run by Professor Carlos Sun. And now, he’s the recipient of a prestigious graduate fellowship.

Zhu Qing and Jacob Kaltenbronn in front of a research poster for Vision-Based Pedestrian Indicator Light for Signalized Intersections

Mizzou Engineering duo wins national Traffic Control Device Challenge

Jacob Kaltenbronn and Zhu Qing are veteran competitors in the Traffic Control Device Challenge (TCDC), but this time they took home the gold.

On the dashboard of a car, two mobile phones are mounted in parallel holders.

Get smart: Phones collect critical road surface data

Your smartphone can already make video calls, play games with someone across the globe and track how well you sleep, how many steps you walk and how long your ride will take to get to you. What if smartphones could tell your department of transportation the quality of the roads you drive on?

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Four faculty receive named professorships

Last spring, faculty representatives from the College of Engineering developed a Faculty Honors Program to adhere to the campus guidelines for awarding faculty fellowships and honors. To select this year’s honorees, Dean Elizabeth Loboa sought recommendations from the College’s Dean’s Council for Teaching Excellence and Dean’s Council for Research Excellence.

Hands typing on a laptop keyboard

Defense using pretense: MU Engineering team sets new cybersecurity paradigm

Instead of simply reacting to cyberattacks after they happen, Mizzou Engineering researchers developed a new approach — cyber “defense using pretense.”

A landscape showing a narrow river shining under hazy sunlight, low mountains in the background, and trees on either side of the bank, dressed in autumn foliage.

Studying behavior could lead to sustainability solutions

At first blush, Damon Hall’s office looks somewhat out of place. Tucked in the Natural Resources Building, his shelves are lined with the kind of reading material seemingly more suited for psychology or sociology. Looks, however, can be deceiving.

A big industrial bridge arching over a canal. Power lines criss-cross over a sky that deepens from tangerine to lavender.

MU Engineering professor helps solidify new bridge inspection standards

Mizzou Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Glenn Washer has long been a proponent of more common-sense, risk-based federal bridge inspection standards, and he’s done the research to back them up. And now, those standards have become federal policy.