Jump to Header Jump to Main Content Jump to Footer

Jacob A. McFarland

Home > Jacob A. McFarland

Jacob A. McFarland

Jacob A. McFarland, Assistant Professor

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Jacob McFarland Portrait

Biography

Jacob McFarland is an assistant professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department. His research is in shock-driven fluid mixing for flows with multiphase effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects and chemical reactions (detonations). His research uses both experiments and simulations to explore these areas. He has worked with Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories to study high-energy density physics in study shock-driven flows, such as the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, in large scale simulations. This research has applications in inertial confinement fusion power, astrophysics, stewardship scienc, and supersonic combustion and detonations. Dr. McFarland’s lab built a horizontal shock tube facility to study shock driven multiphase and plasma interfaces in experiments using high speed optical diagnostics such as Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence an Particle Imaging Velocimetry. He also has worked on multiphase detonations for nanoenergetic systems and detonation engines.

Education

PhD from Texas A&M University
MS from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
BS from Texas Tech University

Technical Focus

Shock Driven Mixing and Turbulence
Multiphase flows
Magnetohydrodynamics

Fluids Mixing and Shock Tube Laboratory

Welcome to Jacob McFarland’s Fluids Mixing and Shock Tube Laboratory page (FMSTL). Our research focus on multiphase fluids mixing created by shock accelerations. We are interested in  hydrodynamic instabilities and their evolution towards turbulent mixing for multiphase problems. These systems arise in many applications including cosmic dust processing by supernovae, shock processing of condensing droplets in supersonic ejectors, shock induced mixing of air and fuel droplet mixtures in scramjets, and in high energy explosions where particles are ejected from boundaries.

We study these problems using a combination of both experiments and high performance simulations. The centerpiece of our lab is our multiphase shock tube facility. This facility consists of an approximately 30 foot long high strength steel tube which allows us to generate controlled shock waves at velocities up to Mach 3.0 into atmospheric pressure air. The tube employs high strength windows to allow optical access for our high speed laser diagnostic system which can make particle imaging velocimetry or planar laser induced fluorescence measurements. In addition to our experiments we work with high performance multiphase computing codes at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories.  We also us our own multiphase particle package which is implemented in the FLASH code and run on our supercomputing node here at the University of Missouri.

Ares simulations (LLNL) showing the effect of particle size on an shocked interface between clean gas and a gas-particle mixture. Time proceeds from left to right in the images, where the rightmost time is approximately 4ms after shock interaction
Ares simulations (LLNL) showing the effect of particle size on an shocked interface between clean gas and a gas-particle mixture. Time proceeds from left to right in the images, where the rightmost time is approximately 4ms after shock interaction
A turbulent interface between nitrogen and carbon dioxide (white) created in our shock tube and illuminated by our laser system.
A turbulent interface between nitrogen and carbon dioxide (white) created in our shock tube and illuminated by our laser system.

Our current focus is on understanding the role of particle properties on the evolution of shock-driven particle-gas instabilities. Our computational work has shown hydrodynamic mixing can be damped by the presence of large, slow, particles. We have also developed evaporation models which show that evaporation of particles also damps the vorticity deposition on these particle-gas interfaces. Our lab is also interested in the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities where a magnetic field may be used to damp mixing,  multiphase flows where particles, active or passive, may be used to enhance heat transfer, and the production of ejecta, particles, from boundaries in high energy blast waves.

Back to Top

Enter your keyword

Search