missouri compacts - research and creative works, Page 17

Portrait of Soumen Jana

Rebuilding Heart Valves Using Tissue Engineering

Assistant Professor Soumen Jana in the Department of Biomedical, Biological and Chemical Engineering wants to develop a different solution for heart valve repair. And the projected goal of this solution is a tissue-engineered heart valve that grows and works like native heart valves.

Drone over a farm

Team Devising Way to Analyze Images from Drone Footage

Imagine being able to assess the health of a single plant in the middle of a field by automatically analyzing a photo of it. The technology exists today by capturing aerial video footage with a drone, but it’s not practical. Now, a Mizzou Engineering team is devising a way to more efficiently create high-resolution panoramic-style images that can be used to make timely decisions on the farm.

Image of highway from driver's point of view and with alert system in use

Study: Drivers Experience Four Levels of Attentive ‘Gaze’ in Response to Alerts From Pre-crash Warning Systems

A team of engineers at the University of Missouri conducted open road testing of three collision avoidance systems and demonstrated that a drivers’ visual behavior in response to an alert generated from a collision avoidance system can be divided into one of four different behavioral categories: active gaze, self-conscious gaze, attentive gaze and ignored gaze.

Prasad Calyam

NSF Project to Advance Edge Computing

Edge computing has the potential to make our computers and devices run smarter and faster. Right now, though, the technology is in its infancy and not ready for prime time.

Sean Goggins stands in a road in front of lawns and trees while wearing a grey shirt.

EECS Faculty Member Helps Develop Metrics for Open Source Software

Those wanting to download and use open source software in the future will have a better sense of what they’re getting, thanks in part to the work of a Mizzou Engineer. Open source software is computer software distributed with a license that allows anyone to see, use and modify the original code. In many cases, an open source project attracts other developers who contribute to the project. This forms a community where those involved improve and enhance the software. Sean Goggins, an associate professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is helping develop metrics to give potential contributors and users better insight into open source projects.

Portrait of Chanwoo Park

Improving the Performance of UAVs

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are a major tool in the current arsenal for the U.S. military. They are used ever increasingly for a variety of missions to help keep personnel out of harm’s way.

Portrait of Henry Brown

Improving Work Zone Safety

A sure sign that summer has arrived in Missouri is when the heat and humidity return. Another indication of summer is when the “Road Construction Ahead” signs pop up along the state’s highways, roads and streets. These signs usually indicate delays in getting to your destination.

MOfeatureimage

Mizzou Engineers, Physicians to Help Rural Missouri Plan Ahead for Pandemic: Geospatial Big Data is Key

Planning ahead for a pandemic—or any disaster situation—is costly and complex. Now, Mizzou researchers are hoping to take the guesswork out of it for Missouri’s smaller communities.

Image looking inside carbon nanotube.

Mizzou Team to Use AI to Grow Carbon Nanotubes in Mass Quantities

A team of Mizzou Engineers is turning to artificial intelligence (AI) to help grow and control large quantities of carbon nanotubes—tiny, cylinder-shaped molecules made of rolled sheets of carbon. Using AI is a novel approach to mass producing them, a problem that has plagued scientists for decades. Now, the National Science Foundation is backing the idea with an award funding the group’s research for three years.

Portrait of Henry Wan

Flu researcher brings team together to tackle COVID-19

Professor Henry Wan has studied flu viruses for years, and he can assure you, coronavirus is not the same. It’s trickier. Less predictable And for many, deadlier. But there are insights scientists can glean from decades of research around the transmission of the flu. That’s why a team of Mizzou researchers is turning its collective attention to COVID-19.