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Through internship at NASA, Mizzou Engineer finds satellite imagery key to monitoring environmental changes

The ice that used to cover roughly 85% of Alaska is thawing, causing ground to collapse and putting communities at risk. Jaweed Nazary, a Ph.D. student in civil and environmental engineering, has found that satellite imagery is key to pinpointing exactly which locations are most susceptible to these changing conditions.

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Missouri Water Center helps secure three USGS National Competitive Grants

With support from the Missouri Water Center, three Mizzou researchers have been awarded highly competitive grants through the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Water Resources Research Act Program. The National Competitive (104G) Grants aim to promote collaboration between USGS and university researchers on significant national and regional water issues.

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Rahamat Ullah Tanvir

Mizzou Engineering has all the elements to prepare graduate students to take on critical problems they may face in their future career endeavors. 

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CeCe Herwig

If you are considering graduate school, reach out to professors to find shared research interests. I've found success at Mizzou largely through the guidance of my professors and fellow graduate students, so I encourage any potential student to form connections within the program!

From left, Bryan Velazquez, Trey Casella, Jacob Dodge, Shelby Hick and Jason Long presenting project

Civil engineering students design walking trail as part of capstone project

This fall, one capstone group is working on designing a potential path for the Hinkson Creek Trail to propose to the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) and City of Columbia Parks and Recreation.

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Engineering professor outlines challenges, strategies around ‘forever’ chemicals in Nature Water journal

Water treatment systems in the U.S. are more than a century old, allowing contaminants to pollute our drinking water and cause health problems. There are technologies that would help states and cities filter out these chemicals without having to replace entire treatment systems; however there’s no mandate for governments to install them. Short of that, there are non-technical solutions that could help reduce pollution levels. Civil and Environmental Engineering Associate Professor Feng “Frank” Xiao outlined these challenges and strategies in a paper published in a Nature journal, Nature Water. Xiao is specifically looking at ways to treat per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), or 'forever' chemicals, which are found in household and industrial products. These chemicals are ending up in our water and causing various medical conditions.

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Mizzou Engineers advanced energy, AI, materials, transportation, health in 2023

This past year, Mizzou Engineers worked on significant solutions to society’s most-pressing challenges. They advanced nuclear power. They studied ways to turn leftover bread crust into plastics that will degrade naturally in the environment. They made artificial intelligence explain itself. They invented new materials, investigated self-driving trucks and came up with an innovative system to optimize blood supplies.

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Equipped with leadership skills, Jacob Dodge earns degree in civil engineering

Jacob Dodge grew up in a household full of Tiger Pride. Both his mom and older brother are Mizzou alumni, but he didn't decide to become a Tiger until visiting Mizzou Engineering and learning about the traditions, opportunities and facilities at the College.

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Community service proves life-changing for Mizzou Engineering STEM Scholars

Want to see engineering coursework come to life? Need a way to release stress and anxiety? Want to transform your life? Get involved in community service. That’s what a group of Mizzou Engineering students have learned as part of the STEM Scholars. The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a holistic scholarship that includes not only academic support but also one-on-one mentoring and volunteer opportunities. STEM Scholars have packaged food at The Food Bank, picked up trash along the Missouri River and, this fall, painted the interior of a house for Habitat for Humanity.

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Mizzou Engineer helps study effects of hurricanes on water, sediment quality

With heavy rainfall and strong winds, hurricanes can alter the make-up of ecosystems, pushing salt water into freshwater bodies and disturbing sediment on the ocean floor. While this impacts water quality and disrupts aquatic life, the effects of hurricanes on water and sediment quality aren’t well understood. Enter Maryam Salehi, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Mizzou. Salehi is an expert in the transport and fate of contaminants, including microplastic pollution.