National Science Foundation

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$5 million NSF grant supports innovative approach to prevent foodborne illnesses

Like a silent saboteur, foodborne pathogens can sneak up and ruin your next meal. One of the biggest culprits is salmonella, a type of bacteria found in many foods that causes more than 1.3 million cases of foodborne illnesses annually according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Despite nationwide efforts, salmonella’s infection rates have remained nearly unchanged for the past 30 years. Now, MU is part of an interdisciplinary effort determined to change that after recently receiving a three-year, $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Convergence Accelerator program.

Timothy Middelkoop

Mizzou Engineer leads regional research computing effort

A team of seven experts from universities across the region — led by Mizzou Engineering’s Timothy Middelkoop — recently received $1.4 million from the National Science Foundation to both meet this need and provide workforce development to fill an emerging need in high-performance research computing.

Faculty participate in a creativity activity.

Faculty cultivate creativity at NSF-funded academy

Biomedical, biological and chemical engineering faculty aim to incorporate creativity into the classroom following NSF-funded academy.

Portrait: Dan Lin

Detecting Deepfake Photos, Videos with a Computerized Brain

Imagine seeing yourself in a photo or video that was never taken, with your head possibly appearing on another person’s body. You’re likely a victim of a deepfake cyberattack — where cyber attackers expertly alter images and videos shared on a social media platform to fool people into believing what they are seeing is true.…

Drawing of person writing on their forearm.

The New Tattoo: Drawing Electronics on Skin

One day, people could monitor their own health conditions by simply picking up a pencil and drawing a bioelectronic device on their skin. In a new study, University of Missouri engineers demonstrated that the simple combination of pencils and paper could be used to create devices that might be used to monitor personal health.

Timothy Middelkoop

Mizzou Engineer leads regional research computing effort

Many colleges and universities…

A pair of glasses sits in front of a computer screen.

Mizzou Engineering’s Chadha protecting your data, identity

While hacking databases is the main way for interested parties to gain users’ personal information, it’s not the only possibility. Intrepid attackers can use perfectly benign means to do so. How? By using readily available aggregate data — for example: census data, medical data focused on how many people in an area suffer from a specific illness, consumer trend data, etc. — and using it to focus on specific individuals.