EECS Research, Page 10

Raw chicken on a cutting board.

MU Engineer developing sensor to improve bacteria detection in poultry

Detecting bacterial pathogens is critical for the poultry slaughtering plants and processing facilities that sell your chicken and turkey. And the quicker and more effective the test, the better it is both for consumers and those companies’ bottom lines. An interdisciplinary team of Mizzou and Lincoln University (Mo.) researchers has been perfecting an easy-to-use, portable sensor for years to solve this very issue.

A young woman stands in front of a poster.

Trio of federally-funded programs showcase computational neuroscience

If you’re looking for a holistic approach to neuroscience research and education, the University of Missouri is the place to be each summer thanks to three federally funded, interdisciplinary programs. Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Professor Satish Nair leads an interdisciplinary team of faculty and grad students who put on two programs funded by the National Science Foundation and another by the National Institutes of Health.

An image of the 3D model of the human genome

Studying chromosomes: Mizzou Engineering develops 3D modeling tool

Science has already allowed us to map the human genome – one of the biggest scientific achievements of our lifetimes. But to really take that achievement to the next level and use it to improve precision health and medicine, we need accurate 3D models to study chromosomes in great detail. A Mizzou Engineering researcher and his team have designed a tool to do just that.

The official seals of the U. S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency of the United States of America

Cybersecurity Work Leads to Center of Academic Excellence Designation

Cyberdefense is a key piece of Mizzou Engineering’s increased focus and support of research in big data analytics. Keeping data secure is critical for individuals, corporations and public entities around the globe, and Mizzou Engineering’s work in the realm of cybersecurity is world class.

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Panacea’s Cloud ready for prime time

Real-time data and information sharing is critical for first responders, especially in situations that don’t allow for ready-made internet access. And after years of research supported by the Coulter Translational Partnership (TP) Program and the National Science Foundation, coupled with a recent market research, an interdisciplinary Mizzou team has the solution.

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Mizzou Engineering team building cloud computing ‘blueprints’

Many companies and researchers need cloud computing resources with various levels of computing power and security capabilities. But in several situations, the needs of similar companies or researchers mirror each other. So instead of taking the time and energy to build from scratch, how can cloud providers help their users build from “blueprints?” Mizzou Engineers have taken a new innovative and massive step toward that goal.

A pair of glasses sits in front of a computer screen.

Mizzou Engineering’s Chadha protecting your data, identity

While hacking databases is the main way for interested parties to gain users’ personal information, it’s not the only possibility. Intrepid attackers can use perfectly benign means to do so. How? By using readily available aggregate data — for example: census data, medical data focused on how many people in an area suffer from a specific illness, consumer trend data, etc. — and using it to focus on specific individuals.

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Mizzou Engineering’s Nair named ASME fellow

Satish Nair recently received a top accolade in his field, earning election as a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering. Nair, a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, joined the ranks of top ASME members honored for their tremendous achievements in the engineering field.

The Smart Bed, decked out in Mizzou sheets.

Getting to the heart of the matter

Compiled over time, the differences in peaks and valleys — called a waveform — in one’s heartbeat can tell medical professionals a lot about a person’s cardiovascular health. But what if you could measure the same thing without all of those invasive sensors attached to your body? Imagine that, instead, you could provide doctors that same data with a sensor located under a mattress or behind a couch cushion.

Jian Lin, Yuan Dong and Jianlin Cheng

Bringing deep learning to materials science: MU team reaches breakthrough

Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms that has a wide array of potential uses, particularly as a candidate material for use in electronic devices, such as LED screens, touch panels, smart phones and solar cells. Graphene’s electrical and optical properties can be significantly altered for better usage. Discovering how these atoms tune to create these properties is one of the most pressing questions in materials science.