Binbin Wang

Natural seep bubbles

Bubbling with curiosity: Mizzou engineer investigates oceanic phenomenon

Binbin Wang has spent years researching hydrocarbons in the Gulf of Mexico and discovering how natural seeps in the ocean floor affect the environment. He is now working on a long-term research project using a National Science Foundation research vessel. 

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Mizzou Water Center receives more than $700,000 in EPA seed grant funding

Cross-disciplinary researchers to look at water quality, quantity issues through eight research and education projects at the Missouri Water Center.

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Faculty, staff, students, alumni recognized with Engineering Awards

Mizzou Engineering on Friday recognized outstanding faculty, staff and students for their dedication and service as part of the College’s annual awards banquet.

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Missouri Water Center helps secure three USGS National Competitive Grants

With support from the Missouri Water Center, three Mizzou researchers have been awarded highly competitive grants through the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Water Resources Research Act Program. The National Competitive (104G) Grants aim to promote collaboration between USGS and university researchers on significant national and regional water issues.

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Interdisciplinary team develops fast, reliable model to predict how seeds move

Playing an essential foundational role in an ecosystem, plants contribute to the well-being of human health by helping create resources like food and medicine. Therefore, to better understand how plants can maintain resiliency in the face of challenges like climate change, a team of researchers at the University of Missouri and Michigan State University recently collaborated to develop an innovative mathematical model that can provide fast and reliable predictions of how far wind can carry a plant’s seeds.

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Wang receives funding to develop technology to study natural seeps

A thousand feet under the ocean, plumes of gases are rising out of plant and animal fossils. These natural seeps provide necessary food and energy for marine life. In rare situations, they could also pose challenges to oceanic exploration if they are massive in volume and could be releasing methane into the environment in shallow waters.

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Engineer develops underwater imaging system to investigate natural seeps

It’s estimated that roughly 160,000 tons of oil and gas naturally enter North American waters each year. These so-called “natural seeps” are hydrocarbons that come out of plant or animal fossils under the seafloor. Depending on where they are, the bubbles…

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Wang selected for National Academies’ Gulf Research Fellowship

A Mizzou Engineer is one of six scientists from across the country selected for an Early-Career Research Fellowship (ECRF).