electronics

Drawing of person writing on their forearm.

The New Tattoo: Drawing Electronics on Skin

One day, people could monitor their own health conditions by simply picking up a pencil and drawing a bioelectronic device on their skin. In a new study, University of Missouri engineers demonstrated that the simple combination of pencils and paper could be used to create devices that might be used to monitor personal health.

Chandler McCoy and Matthias Young in lab

The End of Moore’s Law

For 50 years, the industry has basically observed Moore’s Law, named after Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. He observed in 1965 that the number of transistors per silicon chip doubles every year. But researchers are beginning to say Moore’s Law is no longer a useful paradigm—a new architecture is needed for the computers and supercomputers of tomorrow. Mizzou Engineering Assistant Professor Matthias Young in the Department of Biomedical, Biological and Chemical Engineering is laying the groundwork for that new architecture.

A student team poses for the camera.

RJI announces criteria for Student Innovation Competition 2020

This year’s RJI Student Innovation Competition challenge is to create a program, tool or prototype for photo, video or audio verification.

University of Missouri historic columns

Internship Success: McChesney shines with Bantam Technologies

MU Information Technology senior Ryan McChesney maximized his engineering and leadership skills this summer, landing an internship with Bantam Technologies in Kansas City, Mo. Learn a little more about his internship in his own words.

An image of the 3D model of the human genome

Studying chromosomes: Mizzou Engineering develops 3D modeling tool

Science has already allowed us to map the human genome – one of the biggest scientific achievements of our lifetimes. But to really take that achievement to the next level and use it to improve precision health and medicine, we need accurate 3D models to study chromosomes in great detail. A Mizzou Engineering researcher and his team have designed a tool to do just that.

University of Missouri historic columns

Internship Success: Parker, Sample grow at Google

MU Electrical Engineering & Computer Science juniors Rebecca Parker and Samantha Sample maximized their engineering and leadership skills this summer, landing engineering practicum internships with Google, working out of the San Francisco offices. Learn a little more about their internship in their own words.

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Panacea’s Cloud ready for prime time

Real-time data and information sharing is critical for first responders, especially in situations that don’t allow for ready-made internet access. And after years of research supported by the Coulter Translational Partnership (TP) Program and the National Science Foundation, coupled with a recent market research, an interdisciplinary Mizzou team has the solution.

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Mizzou Engineering team building cloud computing ‘blueprints’

Many companies and researchers need cloud computing resources with various levels of computing power and security capabilities. But in several situations, the needs of similar companies or researchers mirror each other. So instead of taking the time and energy to build from scratch, how can cloud providers help their users build from “blueprints?” Mizzou Engineers have taken a new innovative and massive step toward that goal.

A pair of glasses sits in front of a computer screen.

Mizzou Engineering’s Chadha protecting your data, identity

While hacking databases is the main way for interested parties to gain users’ personal information, it’s not the only possibility. Intrepid attackers can use perfectly benign means to do so. How? By using readily available aggregate data — for example: census data, medical data focused on how many people in an area suffer from a specific illness, consumer trend data, etc. — and using it to focus on specific individuals.

A student team poses for the camera.

Don’t sleep on RJI Student Competition winner NewSnooze

In the age of smart phones and the Internet of Things, the way people get their news is continually evolving, and the journalism industry is constantly working to improve the experience and convenience of news consumption.