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MU researchers reach blood pressure breakthrough

MU researchers reach blood pressure breakthrough

The Mizzou team of researchers utilized non-contact hydraulic bed sensors to estimate relative systolic blood pressure — the top number in a typical blood pressure reading — by extracting features from the ballistocardiogram (BCG) signal.

EECS summer programs shed light on cyber security, machine learning

EECS summer programs shed light on cyber security, machine learning

The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department had another busy summer, hosting its National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates: Undergraduate Research in Consumer Networking Technologies and Summers@Mizzou Hacker Trackers program.

EECS professor named to AIMBE College of Fellows

EECS professor named to AIMBE College of Fellows

Marge Skubic’s extensive and groundbreaking work in the field of eldercare and rehabilitation technology has earned several honors over the years. The latest comes from the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

NIH grant supports tailoring eldercare health alert system for consumer use

NIH grant supports tailoring eldercare health alert system for consumer use

Now, thanks to a new grant from the National Institutes of Health, members of the Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology will investigate tailoring the system to alert the patients themselves or family members, providing actionable data that’s easy for non-health professionals to use.

Computing the future

Computing the future

The MU College of Engineering’s Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) recently wrapped up its 10-week summer session, with brilliant students from around the country completing work on cutting-edge computer science projects.

EECS Professor’s research featured by KOMU

KOMU-TV featured Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Professor Marge Skubic’s research on using bed sensors to predict potential health issues for senior citizens.

Sensors increase ability to predict senior citizen falls

A sensor system developed and used by researchers at the University of Missouri produces images and sends automatic e-mail alerts that can be used to predict a fall within a three-week period.

MU researchers monitor health with bed sensors

Marjorie Skubic, MU professor of electrical and computer engineering and director of the MU Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology, said the bed sensors’ purpose is to detect any possible health problems while helping patients to “age in place” in the comfort of their own homes.

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