Matt Maschmann

Derek Anderson and Matt Maschmann in a lab

How to build an ‘explainable AI’ framework to speed up the innovation process

A nearly $4.9 million grant from the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is supporting the project by University of Missouri engineers.

MSEIFeature

Mizzou celebrates opening of MU Materials Science & Engineering Institute

A new institute at Mizzou will advance collaboration around materials research and education across campus. University and College leaders celebrated the grand opening of the MU Materials Science & Engineering Institute (MUMSEI) at a symposium and ribbon cutting event on Friday.

Exterior of NextGen Health facility

Mizzou Engineers to help NextGen Precision Health professionals process, analyze, protect big data

Mizzou Engineers will help NextGen Precision Health professionals analyze the large volumes of information coming from sophisticated MRI and other imaging equipment, as well as determining how best to store that information securely.

Graphic of carbon nanotubes.

Team uses machine learning to predict the properties of simulated carbon nanotube arrays

A Mizzou Engineering team has spent the past couple of years developing a simulation model to demonstrate how carbon nanotubes can be produced without losing their optimal properties.

Eduardo Torres Dominguez performing lab work

Avoiding food contamination with a durable coating for hard surfaces

In the future, a durable coating could help keep food-contact surfaces clean in the food processing industry, including in meat processing plants. A new study from a team of University of Missouri engineers and food scientists demonstrates that the coating — made from titanium dioxide — is capable of eliminating foodborne germs, such as salmonella and E. coli, and provides a preventative layer of protection against future cross-contamination on stainless steel food-contact surfaces.

Image looking inside carbon nanotube.

Mizzou Team to Use AI to Grow Carbon Nanotubes in Mass Quantities

A team of Mizzou Engineers is turning to artificial intelligence (AI) to help grow and control large quantities of carbon nanotubes—tiny, cylinder-shaped molecules made of rolled sheets of carbon. Using AI is a novel approach to mass producing them, a problem that has plagued scientists for decades. Now, the National Science Foundation is backing the idea with an award funding the group’s research for three years.