CEE Research

Runze Sun in lab

Civil engineering graduate students make strides in water quality research

Graduate students at Mizzou are adventurous and inquisitive, driven by the quest to discover the unknown. They dive headfirst into finding solutions to some of the world’s most pressing problems. Two civil engineering graduate students are diving into the world of clean water, and recently received scholarships from the Missouri Water Center to continue their research.

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Mizzou Engineer part of Dept. of Energy project to cut greenhouse gas emissions at wastewater treatment plants

A Mizzou Engineer is part of a multi-disciplinary team working to improve wastewater treatment processes to cut greenhouse gas emissions by half without increasing costs to plants.

transportation workers fixing a road. Photo courtesy of the Missouri Department of Transportation.

University of Missouri establishes Missouri Work Zone Safety Center of Excellence

As the State of Missouri embarks on the expansion of Interstate 70, the vital east-west transportation corridor connecting St. Louis and Kansas City, researchers at the University of Missouri are preparing to leverage the institution’s 30-plus years of proven expertise in highway work zone safety research to help keep drivers and workers safe during the estimated five-to-seven-year project.

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Wang receives funding to develop technology to study natural seeps

A thousand feet under the ocean, plumes of gases are rising out of plant and animal fossils. These natural seeps provide necessary food and energy for marine life. In rare situations, they could also pose challenges to oceanic exploration if they are massive in volume and could be releasing methane into the environment in shallow waters.

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Drivers, start your monitors: Inside the virtual world of the ZouSim Lab

Carlos Sun and his team have developed innovative vehicle technology becoming leaders in transportation.

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Driving innovative solutions for advancing use of ‘plastic’ roads

In partnership with the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT), researchers from the Mizzou Asphalt Pavement and Innovation Lab (MAPIL) recently created a real-world test road using recycled materials like scrap tires and plastic waste along a portion of Interstate 155 in the Missouri Bootheel.

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Mizzou Engineer develops method to break down PFAS left on water treatment filters

In a recent study, Feng “Frank” Xiao and colleagues at the University of Missouri demonstrate an innovative method using thermal induction heating to rapidly break down PFAS left on the surface of two solid materials — granular activated carbon and anion exchange resins — after these materials have been used to filter PFAS from municipal water systems.

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Civil Engineering team develops realistic artificial data set for road safety studies

A Mizzou Engineering team is hoping artificial intelligence (AI) can be leveraged to prevent vehicle crashes in the future. To that end, they’ve developed realistic artificial data sets (RAD) that can be used to train machines to predict the factors that cause wrecks. These data sets are now available through the U.S. Department of Transportation. The three-year $1.1M project was supported by the US DOT’s Exploratory Advance Research Program.

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Graduate student to use environmental engineering, data analysis skills at NASA

He grew up in a water-strapped village in Afghanistan, worked as a water engineer who helped similar communities and wants to continue to conduct research around environmental problems while teaching future generations. In the meantime, Jaweed Nazary will spend his summer working at NASA.

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Pioneer in degradation of ‘forever chemicals’ brings research to Mizzou

Before most of his peers knew them as “forever chemicals,” Feng “Frank” Xiao knew they were a problem. It was the early 2010s, and he was reviewing Centers for Disease Control data when he noticed a disturbing trend. Pre- and polyfluoroalkyls (PFAS) — compounds mass marketed since the 1940s — were showing up in more than 95% of blood samples, and they appeared to be wreaking havoc on human health.