Drones

Graphic showing drones over network area

Team uses machine learning to train multiple drones to collaborate within a network

The team used machine learning to train drones to work together within a network to survey an area, track objects and transmit information back to a ground station.

Three men with drone.

Army Research Lab internship part of ongoing research around drones

A Mizzou Engineering graduate student has returned from a two-month internship at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Maryland, where he investigated best practices and…

Sharan Srinivas

Truck, drone collaboration could optimize package delivery

What makes Sharan Srinivas’ research unique is that it allows trucks to serve as mobile depots for multiple delivery drones.

Portrait of Derek Anderson

Building Smarter AI

Artificial intelligence is smart, but it’s also too trusting. Currently, AI blindly trusts sensor data and decisions derived from that data. Now, Derek Anderson, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, is trying to figure out how to build AI that can more intelligently react to dynamic unknown environments.

Screenshot of game used to teach autonomous systems.

Autonomous Systems Will be the Future; IT Professor Making Sure Mizzou Engineers are Ready

Driverless taxis. Delivery drones. Robots that can complete complex tasks. These technologies are emerging quickly, and Dale Musser is determined to make sure Mizzou Engineers are ready.

Drone over a farm

Team Devising Way to Analyze Images from Drone Footage

Imagine being able to assess the health of a single plant in the middle of a field by automatically analyzing a photo of it. The technology exists today by capturing aerial video footage with a drone, but it’s not practical. Now, a Mizzou Engineering team is devising a way to more efficiently create high-resolution panoramic-style images that can be used to make timely decisions on the farm.

Portrait of Dale Musser

IT Program Tackles Drone Technologies

hen you want a cloud-computing service at work, you call IT. But who do you contact to integrate a company drone into daily operations? That may not be an everyday problem now, but unmanned autonomous vehicles (UAVs) are quickly becoming a reality for many businesses. And that’s where the Information Technology Program at Mizzou Engineering is stepping up.

Large mass of waterfowl standing in water, photographed from the sky.

Aerial Reconnaissance

Yi Shang, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, recently received a four-year, $372,000 grant from the MDC to assess the feasibility of using unmanned aircraft systems (drones) and deep learning computing techniques for waterfowl and wetland habitat monitoring.