Sustainability, Page 2

XiaoF

Pioneer in degradation of ‘forever chemicals’ brings research to Mizzou

Before most of his peers knew them as “forever chemicals,” Feng “Frank” Xiao knew they were a problem. It was the early 2010s, and he was reviewing Centers for Disease Control data when he noticed a disturbing trend. Pre- and polyfluoroalkyls (PFAS) — compounds mass marketed since the 1940s — were showing up in more than 95% of blood samples, and they appeared to be wreaking havoc on human health.

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Krishnaswamy shares solutions for a zero hunger world at AAAS Conference

More than 2 billion people in the world face hidden hunger and malnutrition, even as 1.3 billion tons of edible food is either lost or wasted every year. Meanwhile, it’s estimated that the global human population will increase to 9-10 billion over the next 50 years, putting even more strain on food production. These are overwhelmingly complex problems. Assistant Professor Kiruba Krishnaswamy has a way of making solutions sound simple.

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Mizzou Engineering researcher helps turn food wastes into biodegradable plastics

A Mizzou Engineer is helping researchers at Virginia Tech develop a process to convert food wastes into biodegradable plastics. Caixia “Ellen” Wan is an associate professor of chemical and biomedical Engineering and a bioprocess engineer. She’s part of a team that received a $2.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to upscale bioplastic production with the goal of replacing petroleum-based plastics while also keeping leftovers out of landfills.

ChengFeature

Mizzou Engineer lends protein prediction expertise to climate change studies at Danforth Plant Science Center

An inter-institutional research team is using the power of computational analysis to pinpoint which plant genes confer resilience against rising temperatures that threaten global food supplies in the coming decades. Mizzou Engineering Professor Jianlin “Jack” Cheng — one of the first scientists in the world to use deep learning, a powerful artificial intelligence technique, to predict protein structures — adds a unique perspective to the work. Since 2018, he’s been collaborating with Dr. Ru Zhang, a plant scientist at the Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, to leverage computational tools in the study of plant genes.

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Researcher working toward safer, more energy efficient LED lighting technology

A Mizzou Engineer has found a way to improve light-emitting diodes (LEDs), reducing the harsh blue hue associated with LED light fixtures.

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Research team devises technique to separate crude oil, water

A Mizzou Engineering team has devised a new technique to separate crude oil and water, which could reduce the amount of contaminated water stored on industrial sites.

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Researcher studying supercritical carbon dioxide for efficient applications

Chanwoo Park recently received funding from the U.S. Army to apply supercritical CO2 for cooling systems for unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) that take advantage of CO2 in an abnormal state somewhere between a vapor and a liquid.

LinFeature

Team investigates methods to make VPP-based 3D printing more sustainable

From custom car parts to medical equipment, vat-photopolymerization (VPP) based 3D printing is expected to usher in a new age of manufacturing. Before it becomes interwoven in our daily lives, however, a Mizzou Engineering team is investigating how to make the process more sustainable.

White light

Building a better bulb: New faculty member brings NSF-funded research to Mizzou

Assistant Professor Peifen Zhu is on a quest to build a better light bulb, and now, she’s looking for Mizzou Engineering students who want to help. Zhu is a new faculty member in electrical engineering and computer science. She brings to Mizzou research around development of safer, more energy efficient lights, work that is supported…

Seep

Engineer develops underwater imaging system to investigate natural seeps

It’s estimated that roughly 160,000 tons of oil and gas naturally enter North American waters each year. These so-called “natural seeps” are hydrocarbons that come out of plant or animal fossils under the seafloor. Depending on where they are, the bubbles…