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Krishnaswamy earns CAREER Award for taking on the challenge of hidden hunger

More than 2 billion people suffer from hidden hunger, a form of malnutrition where individuals lack essential micronutrients — like vitamins and minerals — even though they consume what appears to be an adequate amount of calories. University of Missouri researcher Kiruba Krishnaswamy is focused on tackling this global challenge. She recently received a five-year, $532,000 Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) — the NSF’s most prestigious award for early-career faculty — in support of her project titled “FEAST (food ecosystems and circularity for sustainable transformation) framework to address hidden hunger.”

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Mizzou establishes commercialization hub with NSF award, $5.5 million agreement

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected MU as one of 18 U.S. academic institutions to receive an Accelerating Research Translation award. This award will be used to set up a Technology, Entrepreneurship and Commercialization Hub, supported by a four-year, $5.5 million cooperative agreement with the NSF.

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Study finds correlation between metacognition and effectiveness of virtual instructors in remote classes

Augmented and virtual reality are changing the way universities can offer remote and online courses. These technologies allow for course materials to be presented to students in a more engaging and interactive way. However, right now, there’s a disconnect between the “wow” factor and what students actually learn using these technologies.

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Community service proves life-changing for Mizzou Engineering STEM Scholars

Want to see engineering coursework come to life? Need a way to release stress and anxiety? Want to transform your life? Get involved in community service. That’s what a group of Mizzou Engineering students have learned as part of the STEM Scholars. The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a holistic scholarship that includes not only academic support but also one-on-one mentoring and volunteer opportunities. STEM Scholars have packaged food at The Food Bank, picked up trash along the Missouri River and, this fall, painted the interior of a house for Habitat for Humanity.

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Mizzou Engineer helps study effects of hurricanes on water, sediment quality

With heavy rainfall and strong winds, hurricanes can alter the make-up of ecosystems, pushing salt water into freshwater bodies and disturbing sediment on the ocean floor. While this impacts water quality and disrupts aquatic life, the effects of hurricanes on water and sediment quality aren’t well understood. Enter Maryam Salehi, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Mizzou. Salehi is an expert in the transport and fate of contaminants, including microplastic pollution.

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NSF Research Traineeship program to prepare materials and data scientists

A five-year, $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) is establishing a doctoral training program at the University of Missouri to help prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers to work in the emerging fields of materials science and data science and analytics.

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Mizzou Engineer secures NSF grant to increase computational storage at MU

A Mizzou Engineer is leading an interdisciplinary project that will provide a large-scale storage solution for the thousands of images being generated daily and will leverage artificial intelligence to help researchers analyze the data they collect.

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NSF award allows for adoption of advanced computing, data resources

A Mizzou Engineer is leading a project to improve access to research and educational computing resources needed to take advantage of artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML).

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Mizzou Engineer receives CAREER Award for research around polymer science

In the Mizzou Thin Film Coatings and Materials Electrochemistry Lab, Matthias Young is advancing the field of polymer science for technologies such as batteries and water desalination.

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Cheng developing software to predict protein function using generative AI

A Mizzou Engineer has received funding from the National Science Foundation to develop a tool that will predict how a protein functions based on its order of amino acids. Jianlin “Jack” Cheng envisions developing open source software that would allow a user to enter the sequence, then the system would predict not only how that string of amino acids will form into a structure but also the role it will carry out within a cell. Additionally, the system would pinpoint the specific site of the protein that carries out the function.