Missouri Compacts - Research and Creative Works

Reginald Rogers teaching a class

Overcoming Obstacles and Encouraging Others

Teaching has always come naturally to Reginald Rogers, associate professor of chemical and biomedical engineering, Rogers shares his story to give students hope and encourage them to accomplish difficult things. A shelf full of teaching awards affirm that his philosophy is making an impact.

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Engineering a revolutionary method to measure cardiovascular stiffness

In a discovery that could revolutionize precision heart health care, Mizzou Engineering researchers have developed a way to measure cardiovascular stiffness—or the rigidity of arteries in your heart—based on data already being collected by traditional echocardiograms. “I consider this the most important work I’ve done in my career,” Professor Noah Manring said.

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Team develops prototype for 4D printed medical implant that promotes regeneration of soft tissue

A Mizzou Engineering research team has successfully developed a prototype for a personalized medical implant that promotes the regeneration of soft tissue. The key is 4D printing, a 3D printing technique used on smart materials capable of changing function based on specific conditions.

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Elevating excellence for tomorrow innovators: Jianlin ‘Jack’ Cheng

Jianlin “Jack” Cheng, a Curators’ Distinguished Professor in the University of Missouri College of Engineering, is an expert in electrical engineering and computer science. At Mizzou, he’s passing on his knowledge and preparing the next generation to solve some of society’s most pressing issues through use of advanced technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI).

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Engineer devising hybrid two-phase system to efficiently cool data centers

A Mizzou Engineering researcher is devising a system to cool data centers down more efficiently and effectively. Chanwoo Park is leading a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Lab. It’s part of a $40 million endeavor called COOLERCHIPS, which stands for Cooling Operations Optimized for Leaps in Energy, Reliability and Carbon Hyperefficiency for Information and Processing Systems.

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Mizzou Engineers attend Transportation Research Board Meeting; earn second in Transportation Forecasting Competition

Mizzou Engineers last month attended the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Annual Meeting, the largest gathering of transportation researchers and practitioners in the world with more than 13,000 attendees. TRB is part of the National Academies of Science.

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$5 million NSF grant supports innovative approach to prevent foodborne illnesses

Like a silent saboteur, foodborne pathogens can sneak up and ruin your next meal. One of the biggest culprits is salmonella, a type of bacteria found in many foods that causes more than 1.3 million cases of foodborne illnesses annually according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Despite nationwide efforts, salmonella’s infection rates have remained nearly unchanged for the past 30 years. Now, MU is part of an interdisciplinary effort determined to change that after recently receiving a three-year, $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Convergence Accelerator program.

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Mizzou establishes commercialization hub with NSF award, $5.5 million agreement

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected MU as one of 18 U.S. academic institutions to receive an Accelerating Research Translation award. This award will be used to set up a Technology, Entrepreneurship and Commercialization Hub, supported by a four-year, $5.5 million cooperative agreement with the NSF.

John Gahl (left) and Caleb Philipps, senior research scientists at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, prepare a sample to be loaded into the scanning electron microscope.

Sparking innovation for research

A scanning electron microscope at the University of Missouri Research Reactor will enhance the facility’s investigative capabilities for materials research and discoveries.

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Salim outlines new way to predict laminated glass failure

A Mizzou Engineer has outlined an innovative new way to simulate and predict how laminated glass windows might fail during an explosion. Hani Salim, a professor of civil and environmental engineering, and his team have created a simulation approach that integrates detailed modeling with a relation considering both elasticity and damage.